Champions Biotechnology Begins Preclinical Development of Its Lead Oncology Drug Candidate

Arlington, VA – June 17, 2008 – Champions Biotechnology, Inc. (OTC Bulletin Board: CSBR), a company engaged in the development of advanced preclinical platforms and tumor specific data to enhance the value of oncology drugs, today announced that it has begun preclinical development of the lead Benzoylphenylurea (BPU) sulfur analog compound that the Company acquired last year. The compound has shown promising activity against in vitro and in vivo models of prostate and pancreatic cancer.

Preclinical supplies of the drug substance have been recently secured and the preclinical development process is being initiated. Champions Biotechnology intends to test the BPU Agent utilizing its Biomerk Tumorgraft™ Preclinical Platform. Studies utilizing Biomerk Tumorgrafts are conducted like Phase II clinical trials and leading pharmaceutical companies are utilizing the Platform because it is believed to be more predictive than traditional preclinical models.

“We believe that our Biomerk Tumorgrafts accurately predict the outcome of Phase II clinical trials at the early preclinical stage. This provides an enormous advantage versus traditional preclinical models. By testing the BPU Agent against panels of Biomerk Tumorgrafts from several different cancer types, we should be able to identify the compound’s best application, predict the outcome of Phase II human trials and, if appropriate, discover biomarkers that may accelerate its clinical development,” stated Champions Biotechnology’s Chief Scientific Officer, Manuel Hidalgo, M.D., Ph.D.

Champions Biotechnology’s BPU Agent is an antimitotic inhibitor that targets MAPT (Microtubule-Associated Protein Tau) deficient tumors, a common feature of solid tumors (Molecular Cancer Therapeutics, 2007; 6(5): 1509-1516). The Company, in exchange for 550,000 restricted shares of its common stock, was assigned all the rights in the U.S. and in foreign countries to the applications for these inhibitors developed at Johns Hopkins University by their inventors Drs. Saeed Khan, Gurulingappa Hallur, Manuel Hidalgo and Antonio Jimeno.